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dc.contributor.authorByekwaso, Ndinwane
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-04T09:58:06Z
dc.date.available2022-03-04T09:58:06Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationByekwaso, N. (2010). Poverty in Uganda. Review of African political economy, 37(126), 517-525.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2434
dc.description.abstractIn a recent book entitled Uganda’s economic reforms: insider accounts (Kuteesa et al. 2010), Uganda’s economic performance is portrayed as a role model in reducing poverty, to be emulated by other African countries because of its economic reforms. This paper is a critique of two chapters in the book, one by Whitworth and Williamson (pp. 1– 34) focusing on economic performance and poverty reduction, and another by Kakande (pp. 226 – 245) dealing with poverty monitoring. From the perspective of peasants in rural areas and traders in informal sector operating in urban areas, particularly Kampala City and its suburbs, the critique focuses on the weaknesses of economic growth rates and poverty reduction levels in determining the good economic performance depicted in these chapters. It is intended to stimulate a debate on the success story of Uganda that is portrayed. This critique does not claim impartiality, since the ideology of neoliberalism spearheading the economic reforms is not neutral either, as elaborated by HarrissWhite (2003). Further, as correctly observed by Peet (2003, p. 15), ‘economic policy analysis is a cultural, political and social endeavour, rather than a study of the application of proven, scientific truth ... In this sense any critical understanding of policy formation has to begin with the basic notion that policy serves economic and social interests.’ Therefore, from the proceeding quoted arguments, it is necessary to take an unwavering stand in favour of the disadvantaged in Uganda. The critique is informed by the emerging paradigm of the political economy of institutions. From the history of the policies that the industrialised countries used when they were developing, the paradigm advocates the state’s intervention in the management of economic activity to promote national goals (Chang 2004 [2002], 2003, Kiiza 2002, 2006). Concerning the methodological approach, the critique analyses the articles under examination using available literature. However the arguments in the critique, to a great extent, are also derived from what the author has seen physically and heard while interacting with people as well as the close following of press reports on the country, over the period that the economic reforms have been implemented in Uganda. What is the meaning of economic reforms, and what were they to achieve? The two articles under examination do not directly define economic reforms. However, according to Whitworth and Williamson (2010, p. 4), the economic reforms were to get prices right; establish macroeconomic stability; strengthen revenue and public expenditure management; and toen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.subjectPovertyen_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.titlePoverty in Uganda.en_US
dc.title.alternativeReview of African political economyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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