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dc.contributor.authorBaingana, Rhona K.
dc.contributor.authorNakasujja, Noeline
dc.contributor.authorGalukande, Moses
dc.contributor.authorOmona, Kenneth
dc.contributor.authorMafigiri, David K.
dc.contributor.authorSewankambo, Nelson K.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-14T09:48:53Z
dc.date.available2021-12-14T09:48:53Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationBaingana, R. K., Nakasujja, N., Galukande, M., Omona, K., Mafigiri, D. K., & Sewankambo, N. K. (2010). Learning health professionalism at Makerere University: an exploratory study amongst undergraduate students. BMC medical education, 10(1), 1-10.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6920-10-76
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/474
dc.description.abstractAnecdotal evidence shows that unprofessional conduct is becoming a common occurrence amongst health workers in Uganda. The development of appropriate professional values, attitudes and behaviors is a continuum that starts when a student joins a health professional training institution and as such health professionals in training need to be exposed to the essence of professionalism. We sought to explore undergraduate health professions students’ perceptions and experiences of learning professionalism as a preliminary step in addressing the problem of unprofessional conduct amongst health workers in Uganda. Methods: Eight focus group discussions were conducted with 49 first to fifth year health professions undergraduate students of the 2008/2009 academic year at Makerere University College of Health Sciences. The focus group discussions were recorded and transcribed, and were analyzed using content analysis with emergent coding. Results: The difference in the way first and fifth year students of Makerere University College of Health Sciences conceptualized professionalism was suggestive of the decline in attitude that occurs during medical education. The formal curriculum was described as being inadequate while the hidden and informal curricula were found to play a critical role in learning professionalism. Students identified role models as being essential to the development of professionalism and emphasized the need for appropriate role modeling. In our setting, resource constraints present an important, additional challenge to learning universal standards of health professionalism. Furthermore, students described practices that reflect the cultural concept of communalism, which conflicts with the universally accepted standard of individual medical confidentiality. The students questioned the universal applicability of internationally accepted standards of professionalism.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMC medical educationen_US
dc.subjectLearningen_US
dc.subjecthealth professionalismen_US
dc.subjectMakerere Universityen_US
dc.subjectundergraduate studentsen_US
dc.titleLearning health professionalism at Makerere University: an exploratory study amongst undergraduate studentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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