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dc.contributor.authorMwesige, Angelina Kakooza
dc.contributor.authorWachtel, Lee E.
dc.contributor.authorDhossche, Dirk M.
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-01T08:16:03Z
dc.date.available2022-03-01T08:16:03Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationKakooza-Mwesige, A., Wachtel, L. E., & Dhossche, D. M. (2008). Catatonia in autism: implications across the life span. European child & adolescent psychiatry, 17(6), 327-335. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00787-008-0676-xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2355
dc.description.abstractThere is increasing evidence that catatonia is an important source of impairment in adolescents and adults with autism.Review of the evaluation, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment of catatonia in autism.Presentation and discussion of a case-vignette spanning early childhood to adulthood.Autistic and catatonic symptoms overlap, yet catatonia is diagnosable in about one of seven adolescents and young adults with autism. Case-reports suggest that benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy are effective treatments in the acute and maintenance phase for people with autism who develop catatonia.Catatonia should be assessed in people with autism when there is an obvious and marked deterioration in movement, vocalizations, pattern of activities, self-care, and practical skills. Benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy are favored options for acute and maintenance treatment in these cases. Further studies on the possible biological-genetic overlap between autism and catatonia would be helpful.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEuropean child & adolescent psychiatryen_US
dc.subjectautism – benzodiazepines – catatonia – classification – electroconvulsive therapy – pervasive developmental disorders – psychosis – treatmenten_US
dc.titleCatatonia in Autism: Implications Across the Life Spanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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