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dc.contributor.authorTeufel, Felix
dc.contributor.authorGeldsetzer, Pascal
dc.contributor.authorManne-Goehler, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorKarlsson, Omar
dc.contributor.authorKoncz, Viola
dc.contributor.authorDeckert, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorTheilmann, Michaela
dc.contributor.authorMarcus, Maja-Emilia
dc.contributor.authorEbert, Cara
dc.contributor.authorSeiglie, Jacqueline A.
dc.contributor.authorAgoudavi, Kokou
dc.contributor.authorAndall-Brereton, Glennis
dc.contributor.authorGathecha, Gladwell
dc.contributor.authorGurung, Mongal S.
dc.contributor.authorGuwatudde, David
dc.contributor.authorHouehanou, Corine
dc.contributor.authorHwalla, Nahla
dc.contributor.authorKagaruki, Gibson B.
dc.contributor.authorKarki, Khem B.
dc.contributor.authorLabadarios, Demetre
dc.contributor.authorMartins, Joao S.
dc.contributor.authorMsaidie, Mohamed
dc.contributor.authorNorov, Bolormaa
dc.contributor.authorSibai, Abla M.
dc.contributor.authorSturua, Lela
dc.contributor.authorTsabedze, Lindiwe
dc.contributor.authorWesseh, Chea S.
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Justine
dc.contributor.authorAtun, Rifat
dc.contributor.authorVollmer, Sebastian
dc.contributor.authorSubramanian, S.V.
dc.contributor.authorBarnighausen, Till
dc.contributor.authorJaacks, Lindsay M.
dc.contributor.authorNeve, Jan-Walter De
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-05T10:26:57Z
dc.date.available2022-02-05T10:26:57Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationTeufel, F., Geldsetzer, P., Manne-Goehler, J., Karlsson, O., Koncz, V., Deckert, A., ... & De Neve, J. W. (2020). Analysis of attained height and diabetes among 554,122 adults across 25 low-and middle-income countries. Diabetes Care, 43(10), 2403-2410. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-0019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-0019
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/1936
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising rapidly in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), but the factors driving this rapid increase are notwell understood. Adult height, in particular shorter height, has been suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology and epidemiology of diabetes and may inform how adverse environmental conditions in early life affect diabetes risk. We therefore systematically analyzed the association of adult height and diabetes across LMICs, where such conditions are prominent. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We pooled individual-level data from nationally representative surveys in LMICs that included anthropometric measurements and diabetes biomarkers. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) for the relationship between attained adult height and diabetes using multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression models. We estimated ORs for the pooled sample,major world regions, and individual countries, in addition to stratifying all analyses by sex. We examined heterogeneity by individual-level characteristics. RESULTS Our sample included 554,122 individuals across 25 population-based surveys. Average height was 161.7 cm (95% CI 161.2–162.3), and the crude prevalence of diabetes was 7.5% (95% CI 6.9–8.2). We found no relationship between adult height and diabetes across LMICs globally or in most world regions. When stratifying our sample by country and sex, we found an inverse association between adult height and diabetes in 5% of analyses (2 out of 50). Results were robust to alternative model specifications. CONCLUSIONS Adult height is not associated with diabetes across LMICs. Environmental factors in early life reflected in attained adult height likely differ from those predisposing individuals for diabetes.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherDiabetes Careen_US
dc.subjectHeighten_US
dc.subjectDiabetesen_US
dc.subjectAdultsen_US
dc.subjectLow- and MiddleIncome Countriesen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of Attained Height and Diabetes Among 554,122 Adults Across 25 Low- and Middle Income Countriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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