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dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Tony L.
dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Thomas R.
dc.contributor.authorRwego, Innocent B.
dc.contributor.authorWheeler, Emily
dc.contributor.authorEstoff, Elizabeth L.
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Colin A.
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-04T15:08:25Z
dc.date.available2022-02-04T15:08:25Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationGoldberg, T. L., Gillespie, T. R., Rwego, I. B., Wheeler, E., Estoff, E. L., & Chapman, C. A. (2007). Patterns of gastrointestinal bacterial exchange between chimpanzees and humans involved in research and tourism in western Uganda. Biological Conservation, 135(4), 511-517.https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2006.10.048en_US
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/1910
dc.description.abstractEcological overlap may increase the risks of microbial exchange between humans and wild non-human primates. Escherichia coli bacteria were collected from chimpanzees and humans in Kibale National Park, western Uganda, in May and June 2004, in order to examine whether interaction between humans and apes in the wild might affect gastrointestinal bacterial communities in the two species. Chimpanzees harbored bacteria genetically more similar to those of humans employed in chimpanzee-directed research and tourism than to those of humans from a local village. Most humans (81.6%) and 4.4% of chimpanzees harbored at least one isolate resistant to locally available antibiotics. In isolates from both humans and chimpanzees, resistance was higher to five of these antibiotics than to Ceftiofur, an antibiotic not available in the region. These data indicate that humans and apes interacting in the wild can share genetically and phenotypically similar gastrointestinal bacteria, presumably originating from common environmental sources. Strategies to limit transmission of pathogens between humans and primates, whether that transmission is direct or indirect, would benefit both human health and primate conservation.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBiological Conservationen_US
dc.subjectChimpanzee; Escherichia coli; Pan troglodytes; Transmission; Tourism; Uganda; Zoonoses; Molecular epidemiologyen_US
dc.titlePatterns Of Gastrointestinal Bacterial Exchange Between Chimpanzees And Humans Involved In Research And Tourism In Western Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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