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dc.contributor.authorMwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet
dc.contributor.authorNakayaga Kalyango, Joan
dc.contributor.authorKällander, Karin
dc.contributor.authorSundararajan, Radhika
dc.contributor.authorOwokuhaisa, Judith
dc.contributor.authorObua, Celestino
dc.contributor.authorAlfvén, Tobias
dc.contributor.authorNdeezi, Grace
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-02T21:12:52Z
dc.date.available2022-02-02T21:12:52Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationMwanga-Amumpaire, J., Kalyango, J. N., Källander, K., Sundararajan, R., Owokuhaisa, J., Obua, C., ... & Ndeezi, G. (2020). Perspectives on External Support to Low Level Private Health Facilities in Management of Childhood Infections in Mbarara District, Uganda: A Qualitative Study With Health Workers and Policy Makers. https://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-63967/v1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.21203/rs.3.rs-63967/v1
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/1804
dc.description.abstractWith the under-five child mortality rate of 46.4 deaths per 1000 live births, Uganda needs to accelerate measures to reduce child deaths in order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal 3. While 60-70 % of frontline health services are provided by the private sector, many low level private health facilities are unregistered, unregulated, and often miss out on innovative strategies rolled out by the Ministry of Health. Low level private health facilities need support in order to provide quality health care. We explored the perspectives of health workers and policy makers on external support given to low level private clinics providing health care for children. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted from May to December 2019 with 43 purposively selected key informants. They included 30 health care professionals treating children in low level private clinics and 13 policy makers from Mbarara district and the Uganda Ministry of Health directly involved with ensuring quality of child health. The issues discussed included their views on the quantity, quality, factors determining support received and preferred modalities of support to low level private health facilities. Using an inductive approach, interview transcripts were coded to identify categories and themes. Results: We identified three themes which emerged from the data 1) External support is needed to address socio-economic, regulatory and knowledge gap issues, 2) Current support is not optimal, and, 3) Ideal support underscores working together. While the Ministry of Health recognises its’ responsibility to provide support and guidance to public and private health facilities, it acknowledges lack of support for low level private health facilities currently. Health providers emphasised technical capacity building and more supportive supervisory visits but not simply policing and apportioning blame. Conclusion: The current support being given to low level private health facilities (LLPHF) is inadequate. The support needs to be tailored to the needs of the facility and health facilities have to proactively ask for support. Capacity building with emphasis on training and supportive supervision are key strategies for providing external support to LLPHF.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherResearch Squareen_US
dc.subjectLow-levelen_US
dc.subjectPrivate health careen_US
dc.subjectSupporten_US
dc.subjectChildhood infectionsen_US
dc.subjectPolicy makersen_US
dc.subjectQualitativeen_US
dc.subjectInterviewsen_US
dc.subjectPaediatric careen_US
dc.titlePerspectives on External Support to Low Level Private Health Facilities in Management of Childhood Infections in Mbarara District, Uganda: A Qualitative Study With Health Workers and Policy Makersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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