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dc.contributor.authorOmongo, Christopher A.
dc.contributor.authorKawuki, Robert
dc.contributor.authorBellotti, Antony C.
dc.contributor.authorAlicai, Titus
dc.contributor.authorBaguma, Yona
dc.contributor.authorMaruthi, M. N.
dc.contributor.authorBua, Anton
dc.contributor.authorColvin, John
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-15T19:01:22Z
dc.date.available2022-02-15T19:01:22Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationOmongo, C. A., Kawuki, R., Bellotti, A. C., Alicai, T., Baguma, Y., Maruthi, M. N., ... & Colvin, J. (2012). African cassava whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, resistance in African and South American cassava genotypes. Journal of integrative agriculture, 11(2), 327-336.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2095311912600173
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2154
dc.description.abstractThe whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, is a major pest of cassava, particularly in Africa where it is responsible both for the transmission of plant viruses and, increasingly, for direct damage due to feeding by high populations. To date, there have been no practical solutions to combat this emerging problem, due to the inability of the subsistence farmers that grow cassava to afford expensive inputs such as insecticides. A programme of research was carried out linking institutes in Africa, the UK and South America, to identify possible resistance sources in cassava to the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. The South American genotype MEcu 72 and several Ugandan cassava landraces including Ofumba Chai, Nabwire 1 and Mercury showed good levels of resistance to B. tabaci. Field and screen-house experiments showed that all of the improved, high-yielding cassava mosaic disease (CMD) resistant cassava genotypes assessed were highly susceptible to B. tabaci and supported high populations of all life stages. These data support the hypothesis that the continuing high populations of cassava B. tabaci in Uganda are due, in part, to the widespread adoption of CMD-resistant cassava varieties during the CMD pandemic. They also show that the whitefly, Aleurotrachelus socialis, resistance present in the South American cassava genotypes could have broader applicability in the Old World.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJournal of integrative agricultureen_US
dc.subjectWhitefly resistanceen_US
dc.subjectCassavaen_US
dc.subjectDirect pesten_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectSouth Americaen_US
dc.titleAfrican Cassava Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, Resistance in African and South American Cassava Genotypesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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