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dc.contributor.authorLiu, Chen
dc.contributor.authorHyoung Lee, Jae
dc.contributor.authorGupta, Amanda J.
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Austin
dc.contributor.authorLarkin, Chris
dc.contributor.authorTurimumahoro, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorKatamba, Achilles
dc.contributor.authorDavis, J, Lucian
dc.contributor.authorDowdy, David
dc.date.accessioned2023-01-17T19:31:44Z
dc.date.available2023-01-17T19:31:44Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationLiu C, Lee JH, Gupta AJ, et al. Cost-effectiveness analysis of human-centred design for global health interventions: a quantitative framework. BMJ Global Health 2022;7:e007912. doi:10.1136/ bmjgh-2021-007912en_US
dc.identifier.uri10.1136/ bmjgh-2021-007912
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/handle/123456789/7000
dc.description.abstractHuman-centred design (HCD) is a problem-solving approach that is increasingly used to develop new global health interventions. However, there is often a large initial cost associated with HCD, and global health decision-makers would benefit from an improved understanding of the cost-effectiveness of HCD, particularly the trade-offs between the up-front costs of design and the long-term costs of delivering health interventions. Methods We developed a quantitative framework from a health systems perspective to illustrate the conditions under which HCD-informed interventions are likely to be cost-effective, taking into consideration five elements: cost of HCD, per-client intervention cost, anticipated number of clients reached, anticipated incremental per-client health benefit (ie, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted) and willingness-to- pay. We evaluated several combinations of fixed and implementation cost scenarios based on the estimated costs of an HCD-informed approach to tuberculosis (TB) contact investigation in Uganda over a 2-year period to illustrate the use of this framework. Results The cost-effectiveness of HCD-informed TB contact investigation in Uganda was estimated to vary from US$8400 (2400 clients reached, lower HCD cost estimate) to US$306 000 per DALY averted (120 clients reached, baseline HCD cost estimate). In our model, cost-effectiveness was improved further when the interventions were expected to have wider reach or higher per-client health benefits. Conclusion HCD can be cost-effective when used to inform interventions that are anticipated to reach a large number of clients, or in which the cost of HCD is smaller relative to the cost of delivering the intervention itself.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Global Healthen_US
dc.subjectHuman-centred designen_US
dc.subjectGlobal health interventionsen_US
dc.titleCost-effectiveness analysis of human-centred design for global health interventions: a quantitative frameworken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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