Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKaddumukasa, Mark
dc.contributor.authorNakibuuka, Jane
dc.contributor.authorMugenyi, Levicatus
dc.contributor.authorNamusoke, Olivia
dc.contributor.authorKabaala, Bryan
dc.contributor.authorBlixen, Carol
dc.contributor.authorKatabira, Elly
dc.contributor.authorFurlan, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorSajatovic, Martha
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-15T12:28:57Z
dc.date.available2021-12-15T12:28:57Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationKaddumukasa, M., Nakibuuka, J., Mugenyi, L., Namusoke, O., Birungi, D., Kabaala, B., ... & Sajatovic, M. (2018). Feasibility study of a targeted self-management intervention for reducing stroke risk factors in a high-risk population in Uganda. Journal of the neurological sciences, 386, 23-28. DOI: 10.1016/j.jns.2017.12.032en_US
dc.identifier.uri10.1016/j.jns.2017.12.032
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/610
dc.description.abstractIntroduction—Stroke remains a global concern due to increasing lifespan, patterns of industrialization, adoption of harmful western diets, and an increasing prevalence of risk factors such as hypertension, obesity, and diabetes. We investigated an adopted novel self-management intervention, TargetEd mAnageMent Intervention (TEAM) to reduce modifiable stroke risk factors in Uganda. A six-month, uncontrolled, prospective pilot study to establish feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of TEAM in Ugandans at high risk for stroke was conducted. The primary outcome was change in systolic BP from baseline to 24-week follow-up. Secondary outcomes included change in diastolic BP, serum cholesterol, high and low density lipoprotein (HDL, LDL) and triglycerides. Mean (SD) baseline systolic BP was 162.9 (±25.6) mmHg while mean (SD) baseline diastolic BP was 99.1 (±13.8) mmHg. There was a significant reduction in mean baseline blood pressure of 163/98.8mmHg to blood pressure of 147.8/88.0 mmHg at 24 weeks, p=0.023. There were also significant reductions in the serum total cholesterol levels at 24 weeks with p=0.001. Targeted training in self-management (TEAM) adapted to the Ugandan setting is feasible, highly acceptable to participants and appears to be associated with reduced blood pressure, improved lipid profiles and improved glucose control in diabetics.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of the neurological sciences;386
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of the neurological sciences;386
dc.subjectstrokeen_US
dc.subjectblood pressureen_US
dc.subjectrisk factorsen_US
dc.subjectPreventionen_US
dc.titleFeasibility study of a Targeted Self-Management Intervention for Reducing Stroke Risk Factors in a High-risk Population in Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record