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dc.contributor.authorAbbo, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorOkello, Elialilia S.
dc.contributor.authorMusisi, Seggane
dc.contributor.authorWaako, Paul
dc.contributor.authorEkblad, Solvig
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-15T07:28:27Z
dc.date.available2021-12-15T07:28:27Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationAbbo et al.: Naturalistic outcome of treatment of psychosis by traditional healers in Jinja and Iganga districts, Eastern Uganda – a 3- and 6 months follow up. International Journal of Mental Health Systems 2012 6:13. doi:10.1186/1752-4458-6-13en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1186/1752-4458-6-13
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/535
dc.description.abstractTo determine the naturalistic outcome of treatment of psychosis by traditional healers in Jinja and Iganga districts of Eastern Uganda. Method: A cohort of patients with psychosis receiving treatment from traditional healers’ shrines were recruited between January and March 2008 and followed up at three and six months. The Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview (MINI Plus) was used for making specific diagnosis at the point of contact. For specific symptoms, Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) were used to measure severity of schizophrenia, mania and psychotic depression, respectively. The Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) were used for objective assessments. The Compass Mental Health Index measured well being. Mean scores of the scales were computed using one way ANOVA for independent samples. Associations between outcome and categorical variables were examined at bivariate and multivariate levels.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Mental Health Systemsen_US
dc.subjectPsychosisen_US
dc.subjectTreatment outcomeen_US
dc.subjectTraditional healersen_US
dc.subjectUgandaen_US
dc.titleNaturalistic outcome of treatment of psychosis by traditional healers in Jinja and Iganga districts, Eastern Uganda – a 3- and 6 months follow upen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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