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dc.contributor.authorTweheyo, Mnason
dc.contributor.authorMwesigye Tumusiime, David
dc.contributor.authorMuhairwe, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorTwinomuhangi, Revocatus
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-23T19:36:31Z
dc.date.available2022-10-23T19:36:31Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationMnason, T., David, M. T., Timothy, M., & Revocatus, T. (2013). Elephant damage and tree response in restored parts of Kibale National Park, Uganda. International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation, 5(6), 371-377. DOI: 10.5897/IJBC2013.0573en_US
dc.identifier.other10.5897/IJBC2013.0573
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/handle/123456789/4986
dc.description.abstractElephant tree damage is a key factor in conservation and restoration efforts of African rain forests. This study was conducted between June 2009 and February 2010 to examine elephant damage and tree response in restored parts of Kibale National Park, a rain forest in Uganda. First gazetted as Forest Reserve in 1932, the area had its southern block settled and degraded through human utilization between 1970 and 1987. In 1992, the government of Uganda relocated the settled people and embarked on a restoration process. Whereas, trees such as Ficus species exhibited high coping abilities to elephant damage through re-sprouting, coppicing and bark recovery; Prunus Africana struggled because it is highly preferred by elephant for feeding and is also demanded by humans. Whereas, options that can minimize elephant damage through selective planting of less desired species may be successful, these will deflect the problem of elephant damage to local farmers through experiences of increased crop raiding as the animals search for preferred forage. A more accommodative approach that includes desirable species which can cope with damage; and the protection of endangered species that happen to be desired by both humans and elephant may be more rewarding.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Biodiversity and Conservationen_US
dc.subjectElephantsen_US
dc.subjectTree damageen_US
dc.subjectRestorationen_US
dc.subjectCrop raidingen_US
dc.subjectTropical forest.en_US
dc.titleElephant damage and tree response in restored parts of Kibale National Park, Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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