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dc.contributor.authorMensah, Sylvanus
dc.contributor.authorEgeru, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorEphrem Assogbadjo, Achille
dc.contributor.authorGle`le` Kakaı, Romain
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-18T11:36:59Z
dc.date.available2022-10-18T11:36:59Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationMensah, S., Egeru, A., Assogbadjo, A. E., & Glèlè Kakaï, R. (2020). Vegetation structure, dominance patterns and height growth in an Afromontane forest, Southern Africa. Journal of Forestry Research, 31(2), 453-462. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11676-018-0801-8en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11676-018-0801-8
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/handle/123456789/4954
dc.description.abstractInformation on forest structure is fundamentally important to track successional vegetation dynamics for efficient forest management. This study reports on vegetation characteristics, dominance patterns and species height growth in a northern mistbelt forest type in South Africa. Common alpha-diversity indices (species richness and Shannon–Weiner diversity), structural vegetation parameters (tree density and basal area), and species importance value index were used. Size class distribution and height–diameter allometry were further examined for the overall stand and most important species. Stem densities (472.0 ± 43.5 and 605.3 ± 28.1 trees ha-1 for C 5 cm to\10 cm and C 10 cm dbh (diameter at breast height) classes, respectively) and basal area values (1.99 ± 0.19 and 48.07 ± 3.46 m2 ha-1, respectively) are comparable to other Afromontane forests in East Africa. The overall stand showed an inverted-J shaped distribution pattern which is a typical feature of stand size class distribution in most natural forests. Most ecologically important species also exhibited an inverted-J shaped distribution pattern, suggesting good regeneration and recruitment potential. There were significant differences in species on height, reflecting species-specific height growth patterns, possibly a result of intrinsic growth potential and competitive interactions. The present study suggests that conservation and management policies, including protection of surrounding land uses against fire, contribute to maintaining a successful recovery of these forests. However, it should be noted that these forests may be experiencing relatively slow dynamic flux as a result of the overmature state of some trees with several years under relatively strict protection.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Forestry Research,en_US
dc.subjectDiversityen_US
dc.subjectPopulation structureen_US
dc.subjectSpecies compositionen_US
dc.subjectSize class distributionen_US
dc.titleVegetation structure, dominance patterns and height growth in an Afromontane forest, Southern Africaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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