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dc.contributor.authorLinden, Allison F.
dc.contributor.authorSerufusa Sekidde, Francis
dc.contributor.authorGalukande, Moses
dc.contributor.authorKnowlton, Lisa M.
dc.contributor.authorChackungal, Smita
dc.contributor.authorMcQueen, K. A. Kelly
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-14T06:44:05Z
dc.date.available2021-12-14T06:44:05Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationLinden, A. F., Sekidde, F. S., Galukande, M., Knowlton, L. M., Chackungal, S., & McQueen, K. K. (2012). Challenges of surgery in developing countries: a survey of surgical and anesthesia capacity in Uganda’s public hospitals. World journal of surgery, 36(5), 1056-1065.DOI 10.1007/s00268-012-1482-7en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1007/s00268-012-1482-7
dc.identifier.other10.1007/s00268-012-1482-7
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/461
dc.description.abstractThere are large disparities in access to surgical services due to a multitude of factors, including insufficient health human resources, infrastructure, medicines, equipment, financing, logistics, and information reporting. This study aimed to assess these important factors in Uganda’s government hospitals as part of a larger study examining surgical and anesthesia capacity in lowincome countries in Africa.Methods A standardized survey tool was administered via interviews with Ministry of Health officials and key health practitioners at 14 public government hospitals throughout the country. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results There were a total of 107 general surgeons, 97 specialty surgeons, 124 obstetricians/gynecologists (OB/ GYNs), and 17 anesthesiologists in Uganda, for a rate of one surgeon per 100,000 people. There was 0.2 major operating theater per 100,000 people. Altogether, 53% of all operations were general surgery cases, and 44% were OB/GYN cases. In all, 73% of all operations were performed on an emergency basis. All hospitals reported unreliable supplies of water and electricity. Essential equipment was missing across all hospitals, with no pulse oximeters found at any facilities. A uniform reporting mechanism for outcomes did not exist. Conclusions There is a lack of vital human resources and infrastructure to provide adequate, safe surgery at many of the government hospitals in Uganda. A large number of surgical procedures are undertaken despite these austere conditions. Many areas that need policy development and international collaboration are evident. Surgical services need to become a greater priority in health care provision in Uganda as they could promise a significant reduction inmorbidity and mortality.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWorld journal of surgeryen_US
dc.subjectSurgeryen_US
dc.subjectDeveloping Countriesen_US
dc.subjectAnesthesiaen_US
dc.subjectPublic Hospitalsen_US
dc.titleChallenges of Surgery in Developing Countries: A Survey of Surgical and Anesthesia Capacity in Uganda’s Public Hospitalsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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