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dc.contributor.authorKwizera, Arthur
dc.contributor.authorFestic, Emir
dc.contributor.authorDünser, Martin W.
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-27T15:44:27Z
dc.date.available2022-05-27T15:44:27Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationKwizera, A., Festic, E., & Dünser, M. W. (2016). What’s new in sepsis recognition in resource-limited settings?. Intensive care medicine, 42(12), 2030-2033.DOI 10.1007/s00134-016-4222-xen_US
dc.identifier.otherDOI 10.1007/s00134-016-4222-x
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/handle/123456789/3597
dc.description.abstractSepsis is a life-threatening condition characterized by one or more organ dysfunctions due to a dysregulated host response to infection [1] or, in certain cases, due to direct pathogen effects. Sepsis is not only associated with bacterial or fungal infections but also with any other infection such as viral disease, protozoal (e.g., malaria), or tropical infections. Although the literature suggests that sepsis is predominantly a healthcare issue in resource-rich countries, the global burden of acute infections is highest in resource-limited areas [2]. Successful sepsis management relies on various components of which early recognition is essential. Evidence and recommendations for sepsis recognition are mainly based on research performed in resource-rich settings [3]. However, resource-rich and -limited countries differ in healthcare accessibility [4] and infectious disease epidemiology [5–7]. It is therefore unreasonable to directly translate evidence between these settings.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIntensive care medicineen_US
dc.subjectsepsis recognitionen_US
dc.subjectfungal infectionsen_US
dc.titleWhat’s new in sepsis recognition in resource‑limited settings?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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