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dc.contributor.authorAmone-P’Olak, Kennedy
dc.contributor.authorJones, Peter
dc.contributor.authorMeiser-Stedman, Richard
dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Rosemary
dc.contributor.authorStephen Ayella-Ataro, Paul
dc.contributor.authorAmone, Jackson
dc.contributor.authorOvuga, Emilio
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-11T14:02:44Z
dc.date.available2022-03-11T14:02:44Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationAmone-P'Olak, K., Jones, P., Meiser-Stedman, R., Abbott, R., Ayella-Ataro, P. S., Amone, J., & Ovuga, E. (2014). War experiences, general functioning and barriers to care among former child soldiers in Northern Uganda: the WAYS study. Journal of Public Health, 36(4), 568-576. doi:10.1093/pubmed/fdt126en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1093/pubmed/fdt126
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2757
dc.description.abstractExposure to war is associated with considerable risks for long-term mental health problems (MHP) and poor functioning. Yet little is known about functioning and mental health service (MHS) use among former child soldiers (FCS).We assessed whether different categories of war experiences predict functioning and perceived need for, sources of and barriers to MHS among FCS. Methods Data were drawn from an on-goingWar-affected Youths (WAYS) cohort study of FCS in Uganda. Participants completed questionnaires about war experiences, functioning and perceived need for, sources of and barriers to MHS. Regression analyses and parametric tests were used to assess between-group differences. Results Deaths, material losses, threat to loved ones and sexual abuse significantly predicted poor functioning. FCS who received MHS function better than those who did not. Females reported more emotional and behavioural problems and needed MHS more than males. FCS who function poorly indicated more barriers to MHS than those who function well. Stigma, fear of family break-up and lack of health workers were identified as barriers to MHS. Conclusions Various war experiences affect functioning differently. A significant need for MHS exists amidst barriers to MHS. Nevertheless, FCS are interested in receiving MHS and believe it would benefit themen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Public Healthen_US
dc.subjectCareen_US
dc.subjectMental health problemsen_US
dc.subjectNorthern Ugandaen_US
dc.subjectwar-affected populationen_US
dc.titleWar experiences, general functioning and barriers to care among former child soldiers in Northern Uganda: the WAYS studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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