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dc.contributor.authorTumusiime, Emmanuel Mutebile
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-04T09:06:57Z
dc.date.available2022-03-04T09:06:57Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationBrownbridge, M., & Tumusiime‐Mutebile, E. (2007). Aid and fiscal deficits: lessons from Uganda on the implications for macroeconomic management and fiscal sustainability. Development Policy Review, 25(2), 193-213.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7679.2007.00366.x
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2432
dc.description.abstractThis article contributes to the ongoing debate on the macroeconomic management of large aid inflows to low-income countries by analysing lessons drawn from Uganda, where the fiscal deficit before grants, which was largely aid-funded, doubled to over 12% of GDP in the early 2000s. It focuses on the implications of the widening fiscal deficit for monetary policy, the real exchange rate, debt sustainability and the vulnerability of the budget to fiscal shocks, and argues that large fiscal deficits, even when funded predominantly by aid, risk undermining macroeconomic objectives and long-run fiscal sustainability.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWilleyen_US
dc.subjectAiden_US
dc.subjectFiscal deficitsen_US
dc.subjectUgandaen_US
dc.subjectMacroeconomic Managementen_US
dc.subjectFiscal Sustainabilityen_US
dc.titleAid and fiscal deficitsen_US
dc.title.alternative:lessons from Uganda on the implications for macroeconomic management and fiscal sustainabilityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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