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dc.contributor.authorMuhumuza Kananura, Rornald
dc.contributor.authorEkirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorPaina, Ligia
dc.contributor.authorBumba, Ahmed
dc.contributor.authorMulekwa, Godfrey
dc.contributor.authorNakiganda-Busiku, Dinah
dc.contributor.authorLin Oo, Htet Nay
dc.contributor.authorNamusoke Kiwanuka, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Asha
dc.contributor.authorPeters, David H.
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-01T20:15:40Z
dc.date.available2022-03-01T20:15:40Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationKananura, R. M., Ekirapa-Kiracho, E., Paina, L., Bumba, A., Mulekwa, G., Nakiganda-Busiku, D., ... & Peters, D. H. (2017). Participatory monitoring and evaluation approaches that influence decision-making: lessons from a maternal and newborn study in Eastern Uganda. Health research policy and systems, 15(2), 55-68. DOI 10.1186/s12961-017-0274-9en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1186/s12961-017-0274-9
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2385
dc.description.abstractThe use of participatory monitoring and evaluation (M&E) approaches is important for guiding local decision-making, promoting the implementation of effective interventions and addressing emerging issues in the course of implementation. In this article, we explore how participatory M&E approaches helped to identify key design and implementation issues and how they influenced stakeholders’ decision-making in eastern Uganda. Method: The data for this paper is drawn from a retrospective reflection of various M&E approaches used in a maternal and newborn health project that was implemented in three districts in eastern Uganda. The methods included qualitative and quantitative M&E techniques such as key informant interviews, formal surveys and supportive supervision, as well as participatory approaches, notably participatory impact pathway analysis. Results: At the design stage, the M&E approaches were useful for identifying key local problems and feasible local solutions and informing the activities that were subsequently implemented. During the implementation phase, the M&E approaches provided evidence that informed decision-making and helped identify emerging issues, such as weak implementation by some village health teams, health facility constraints such as poor use of standard guidelines, lack of placenta disposal pits, inadequate fuel for the ambulance at some facilities, and poor care for low birth weight infants. Sharing this information with key stakeholders prompted them to take appropriate actions. For example, the sub-county leadership constructed placenta disposal pits, the district health officer provided fuel for ambulances, and health workers received refresher training and mentorship on how to care for newborns. Conclusion: Diverse sources of information and perspectives can help researchers and decision-makers understand and adapt evidence to contexts for more effective interventions. Supporting districts to have crosscutting, routine information generating and sharing platforms that bring together stakeholders from different sectors is therefore crucial for the successful implementation of complex development interventions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherHealth research policy and systemsen_US
dc.subjectParticipatory monitoring and evaluationen_US
dc.subjectImplementation researchen_US
dc.subjectMaternal and newborn healthen_US
dc.subjectDecision makingen_US
dc.subjectStakeholdersen_US
dc.titleParticipatory monitoring and evaluation approaches that influence decision-making: lessons from a maternal and newborn study in Eastern Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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