Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBuregyeya, Esther
dc.contributor.authorNuwaha, Fred
dc.contributor.authorWanyenze, Rhoda K.
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Ellen M. H.
dc.contributor.authorCriel, Bart
dc.contributor.authorVerver, Suzanne
dc.contributor.authorKasasa, Simon
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-01T09:49:34Z
dc.date.available2022-03-01T09:49:34Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationBuregyeya E, Nuwaha F, Wanyenze RK, Mitchell EMH, Criel B, et al. (2012) Utilization of HIV and Tuberculosis Services by Health Care Workers in Uganda: Implications for Occupational Health Policies and Implementation. PLoS ONE 7(10): e46069. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0046069en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0046069
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2366
dc.description.abstractAccess to HIV testing and subsequent care among health care workers (HCWs) form a critical component of TB infection control measures for HCWs. Challenges to and gaps in access to HIV services among HCWs may thus compromise TB infection control. This study assessed HCWs HIV and TB screening uptake and explored their preferences for provision of HIV and TB care. Methods: A cross-sectional mixed-methods study involving 499 HCWs and 8 focus group discussions was conducted in Mukono and Wakiso districts in Uganda between October 2010 and February 2011. Results: Overall, 5% of the HCWs reported a history of TB in the past five years. None reported routine screening for TB disease or infection, although 89% were willing to participate in a TB screening program, 77% at the workplace. By contrast, 95% had previously tested for HIV; 34% outside their workplace, and 27% self-tested. Nearly half (45%) would prefer to receive HIV care outside their workplace. Hypothetical willingness to disclose HIV positive status to supervisors was moderate (63%) compared to willingness to disclose to sexual partners (94%). Older workers were more willing to disclose to a supervisor (adjusted prevalence ratio [APR] = 1.51, CI = 1.16–1.95). Being female (APR = 0.78, CI = 0.68–0.91), and working in the private sector (APR = 0.81, CI = 0.65–1.00) were independent predictors of unwillingness to disclose a positive HIV status to a supervisor. HCWs preferred having integrated occupational services, versus stand-alone HIV care. Conclusions: Discomfort with disclosure of HIV status to supervisors suggests that universal TB infection control measures that benefit all HCWs are more feasible than distinctions by HIVstatus, particularly for women, private sector, and younger HCWs. However, interventions to reduce stigma and ensuring confidentiality are also essential to ensure uptake of comprehensive HIV care including Isoniazid Preventive Therapy among HCWs.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPLoS ONEen_US
dc.subjectTuberculosisen_US
dc.subjectHealth care workersen_US
dc.subjectWorld Health Organizationen_US
dc.subjectHIV positive HCWsen_US
dc.titleUtilization of HIV and Tuberculosis Services by Health Care Workers in Uganda: Implications for Occupational Health Policies and Implementationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record