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dc.contributor.authorMwesige, Angelina Kakooza
dc.contributor.authorStoppelbein, Laura
dc.contributor.authorDhossche, Dirk M.
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-28T20:20:58Z
dc.date.available2022-02-28T20:20:58Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationKakooza-Mwesige, A., Stoppelbein, L., & Dhossche, D. M. Psychosis in autism. The Spectrum of Psychotic Disorders, 233.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2341
dc.description.abstractPsychosis has carried different meanings since its introduction more than 150 years ago (Beer, 1996). Others have described the social and intellectual contexts that have shaped the concept of psychosis at different times and places (Berrios,1987; Beer, 1995). Modern classification systems incorporate psychosis in various disorders as a serious disturbance in ‘‘reality testing’’ expressed as hallucinations, delusions, thought disturbance, disorganized behavior, or catatonia. Recent advances in neuroscience hold the promise of elucidating the brain mechanisms of psychosis and finding improved antipsychotic treatments. Fujii & Ahmed (2004) have recently proposed conceptualizing psychosis as a neurobiological syndrome with its own pathophysiology and treatment algorithm regardless of etiological factors and underlying diagnoses.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Spectrum of Psychotic Disordersen_US
dc.titlePsychosis in Autismen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US


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