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dc.contributor.authorZAVUGA, Robert
dc.contributor.authorWaako, Susan
dc.contributor.authorTwimukye, Moses
dc.contributor.authorMugambe, Richard K
dc.contributor.authorIsunju, John Bosco
dc.contributor.authorMuwonge, Haruna
dc.contributor.authorMasete, Ivan
dc.contributor.authorKusasira, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorGuwatudde, David
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-25T21:12:12Z
dc.date.available2022-02-25T21:12:12Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2312
dc.description.abstract17AbstractBackgroundDespite Low back pain (LBP) being one of the most common complaints among pregnant women,healthcare workers write it off as a normal experience of the pregnancy, thus remaining untreated. It isknown to affect the daily functionality of many pregnant women in activities including those that involvesitting, walking, standing and lifting. The inadequacy of information on LBP among pregnant women inUganda may have led to the unavailability of obstetric guidelines for its diagnosis and management. Thisstudy established the effects of LBP effects on daily performance, management and coping strategiesamong pregnant women attending an antenatal clinic in Eastern Uganda.MethodsThis was a cross-sectional study that enrolled 341 pregnant women attending antenatal care. Theprimary outcome measure was LBP. The study enrolled pregnant women who reported having LBP andcorrectly located the site of the pain using the pain and body chart as having LBP. Data onsociodemographic characteristics, pain intensity, functional disability, effects of LBP on dailyperformance, management and coping strategies were collected.ResultsOf the 341 respondents, (105, 30.8%) reported LBP. Majority of the women with LBP (71, 67.6%) hadminimal disability with an Owestry Disability Index (ODI) score of 0-20%. The activities that were mostaffected with mild interference on daily routine activities were lifting 81%, standing 74%, personal care74% and traveling 74%. Majority of the respondents (80, 76.19%) reported their LBP during the Antenatalcare (ANC) visits at the hospital and of these 62 (79.49%) were given painkillers, 13 (16.67%) receivedcounselling and patient education, 3 (3.85%). For the respondents who did not receive any treatment fromthe ANC visits, the majority (23, 60.53%) used herbs and others used self-medication (5, 13.16%)ConclusionLBP affects most of the daily functional activities of pregnant women with minimal and moderatedisability. Although the disability is not severe, it affects their quality of life and productivity. The pregnant women managed their LBP mainly by conservative means of treatment, especially by the use ofpharmacological management and rest from activities.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherResearch Squareen_US
dc.subjectLow Back Painen_US
dc.subjectPregnant womenen_US
dc.subjectDisabilityen_US
dc.subjectManagement and coping strategiesen_US
dc.subjectAntenatal Clinicen_US
dc.subjectKamuli Districten_US
dc.subjectUgandaen_US
dc.titleLow Back Pain Effects, Management and Coping Strategies among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic in Eastern Uganda: A Cross- Sectional Study.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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