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dc.contributor.authorKateete, David Patrick
dc.contributor.authorKatabazi, Fred Ashaba
dc.contributor.authorOkeng, Alfred
dc.contributor.authorOkee, Moses
dc.contributor.authorMusinguzi, Conrad
dc.contributor.authorAsiimwe, Benon Byamugisha
dc.contributor.authorKyobe, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorAsiimwe, Jeniffer
dc.contributor.authorBoom, W. Henry
dc.contributor.authorJoloba, Moses Lutaakome
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-17T20:15:44Z
dc.date.available2022-02-17T20:15:44Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationKateete, D. P., Katabazi, F. A., Okeng, A., Okee, M., Musinguzi, C., Asiimwe, B. B., ... & Joloba, M. L. (2012). Rhomboids of Mycobacteria: characterization using an aarA mutant of Providencia stuartii and gene deletion in Mycobacterium smegmatis.https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0045741en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2181
dc.description.abstractRhomboids are ubiquitous proteins with unknown roles in mycobacteria. However, bioinformatics suggested putative roles in DNA replication pathways and metabolite transport. Here, mycobacterial rhomboid-encoding genes were characterized; first, using the Providencia stuartii null-rhomboid mutant and then deleted from Mycobacterium smegmatis for additional insight in mycobacteria.Using in silico analysis we identified in M. tuberculosis genome the genes encoding two putative rhomboid proteins; Rv0110 (referred to as “rhomboid protease 1”) and Rv1337 (“rhomboid protease 2”). Genes encoding orthologs of these proteins are widely represented in all mycobacterial species. When transformed into P. stuartii null-rhomboid mutant (ΔaarA), genes encoding mycobacterial orthologs of “rhomboid protease 2” fully restored AarA activity (AarA is the rhomboid protein of P. stuartii). However, most genes encoding mycobacterial “rhomboid protease 1” orthologs did not. Furthermore, upon gene deletion in M. smegmatis, the ΔMSMEG_4904 single mutant (which lost the gene encoding MSMEG_4904, orthologous to Rv1337, “rhomboid protease 2”) formed the least biofilms and was also more susceptible to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin, antimicrobials that inhibit DNA gyrase. However, the ΔMSMEG_5036 single mutant (which lost the gene encoding MSMEG_5036, orthologous to Rv0110, “rhomboid protease 1”) was not as susceptible. Surprisingly, the double rhomboid mutant ΔMSMEG_4904–ΔMSMEG_5036 (which lost genes encoding both homologs) was also not as susceptible suggesting compensatory effects following deletion of both rhomboid-encoding genes. Indeed, transforming the double mutant with a plasmid encoding MSMEG_5036 produced phenotypes of the ΔMSMEG_4904 single mutant (i.e. susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin).Mycobacterial rhomboid-encoding genes exhibit differences in complementing aarA whereby it's only genes encoding “rhomboid protease 2” orthologs that fully restore AarA activity. Additionally, gene deletion data suggests inhibition of DNA gyrase by MSMEG_4904; however, the ameliorated effect in the double mutant suggests occurrence of compensatory mechanisms following deletion of genes encoding both rhomboids.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPlos Oneen_US
dc.titleRhomboids of Mycobacteria: Characterization Using an aarA Mutant of Providencia stuartii and Gene Deletion in Mycobacterium smegmatisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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