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dc.contributor.authorSsekamatte, Tonny
dc.contributor.authorIsunju, John B.
dc.contributor.authorMuyanga, Naume
dc.contributor.authorBuregyeya, Esther
dc.contributor.authorMugambe, Richard K.
dc.contributor.authorWanyenze, Rhoda K.
dc.contributor.authorBukenya, Justine N.
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-15T06:12:52Z
dc.date.available2022-02-15T06:12:52Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationSsekamatte, T., Isunju, J. B., Naume, M., Buregyeya, E., Mugambe, R. K., Wanyenze, R. K., & Bukenya, J. N. (2020). Barriers to access and utilisation of HIV/STIs prevention and care services among trans-women sex workers in the greater Kampala metropolitan area, Uganda. BMC infectious diseases, 20(1), 1-15.https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-020-05649-5en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-020-05649-5
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2110
dc.description.abstractTrans-women sex workers bear the greatest brunt of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). Trans-women are 49 times more at risk of HIV infections compared to the general population. However, they remain underserved and continue to grapple with access to and utilization of HIV/STI prevention services. This study explored barriers to access and utilization of HIV/STI prevention services and associated coping mechanisms. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted among trans-women sex workers in the Greater Kampala Metropolitan area, Uganda. A total of 22 in-depth interviews, 6 key informant interviews and 9 focus group discussions were conducted to obtain data on barriers to access and utilization of HIV and other STI prevention and care services, and coping strategies of trans-women sex workers. Data were analyzed through thematic analysis using a hybrid of inductive and deductive approaches. Individual level barriers to access and utilization of HIV/STI prevention and care services included internalized stigma and low socio-economic status. Healthcare system barriers included social exclusion and lack of recognition by other key population groups; stigmatisation by some healthcare providers; breach of confidentiality by some healthcare providers; limited hours of operation of some key population-friendly healthcare facilities; discrimination by straight patients and healthcare providers; stockout of STI drugs; inadequate access to well-equipped treatment centres and high cost of drugs. At community level, transphobia hindered access and utilisation of HIV/STI prevention and care services. The coping strategies included use of substitutes such as lotions, avocado or yoghurt to cope with a lack of lubricants. Herbs were used as substitutes for STI drugs, while psychoactive substances were used to cope with stigma and discrimination, and changing the dress code to hide their preferred gender identityen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMC infectious diseasesen_US
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_US
dc.subjectSexually transmitted infectionsen_US
dc.subjectTrans-womenen_US
dc.subjectSex worken_US
dc.subjectUgandaen_US
dc.titleBarriers to access and utilisation of HIV/STIs prevention and care services among transwomen sex workers in the greater Kampala metropolitan area, Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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