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dc.contributor.authorNanvubya, Annet
dc.contributor.authorWanyenze, Rhoda K.
dc.contributor.authorKamacooko, Onesmus
dc.contributor.authorNakaweesa, Teddy
dc.contributor.authorMpendo, Juliet
dc.contributor.authorKawoozo, Barbarah
dc.contributor.authorMatovu, Francis
dc.contributor.authorNabukalu, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorOmoding, Geoffrey
dc.contributor.authorKaweesi, Jed
dc.contributor.authorNdugga, John
dc.contributor.authorBagaya, Bernard
dc.contributor.authorChinyenze, Kundai
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Matt
dc.contributor.authorVan Geertruyden, Jean P.
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-11T11:10:41Z
dc.date.available2022-02-11T11:10:41Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationNanvubya, A., Wanyenze, R. K., Kamacooko, O., Nakaweesa, T., Mpendo, J., Kawoozo, B., ... & Van Geertruyden, J. P. (2020). Barriers and facilitators of family planning use in fishing communities of Lake Victoria in Uganda. Journal of primary care & community health, 11, 2150132720943775.https://doi.org/10.1177/21501327209437en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/21501327209437
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/2067
dc.description.abstractFamily planning (FP) is a key element in the conduct of research and is essential in managing family sizes. Although fishing communities (FCs) are targeted populations for HIV prevention research, their FP practices are poorly understood. We explored barriers and facilitators of FP use in FCs of Lake Victoria in Uganda. Methods: We employed a mixed-methods approach comprising a cross-sectional survey, in-depth interviews, and focus group discussions in 2 FCs. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze quantitative data and a thematic approach to generate themes from the qualitative data. Results: Up to 1410 individuals participated in the survey and 47 in the qualitative study. Just over a third (35.6%) used FP. The most commonly used methods were condoms, pills, and injectables. In Kigungu community, participants whose religion was Anglican and Muslim were more likely to use FP than Catholics (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.45; 95% CI 1.05-1.99 and aOR 1.45; 95% CI 1.05-2.07, respectively). Participants were more likely to use FP if they had satisfactory FP knowledge compared to those with no satisfactory FP knowledge (aOR 1.79; 95% CI 1.23-2.61), or if they were married compared to their single counterparts (aOR 1.84; 95% CI 1.32-2.57). In both communities, participants were more likely to use FP if they had 2 or more sexual partners in the past 12 months than those with less than 2 sexual partners (aOR 1.41 95% CI 1.07-1.87 and aOR 2.60; 95% CI 1.36-4.97). Excessive bleeding and delayed fecundity; fertility desire; gender preferences of children; method stock outs and lack of FP trained personnel constituted barriers to FP use. There were also cultural influences in favor of large families.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJournal of primary care & community healthen_US
dc.subjectfamily planningen_US
dc.subjectfacilitatorsen_US
dc.subjectbarriersen_US
dc.subjectfishing communityen_US
dc.titleBarriers and Facilitators of Family Planning Use in Fishing Communities of Lake Victoria in Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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