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dc.contributor.authorKankya, Clovice
dc.contributor.authorAkandinda, Annah
dc.contributor.authorRwabukwali, Charles B.
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-04T17:36:44Z
dc.date.available2022-02-04T17:36:44Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationKankya, C., Akandinda, A., & Rwabukwali, C. B. (2013). The role of civil society organisations (CSOs) in healthcare delivery system: A case study of child immunisation in Kabarole district, Uganda. Health, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2013.58174en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.4236/health.2013.58174
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/1927
dc.description.abstractThe importance of civil society organisations in health care delivery systems can- not be under-rated in sub-Saharan Africa and other developing nations worldwide. Civil society organisations play a central role in service delivery and development of democracy. How- ever, little is known about the roles and achievements of Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) in healthcare. The study aimed at exploring the role of civil society organisations in health care delivery system particularly in children immunization. Methods: A questionnaire survey involving 282 households was conducted. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics followed by multi variable logistic regression. Results: Ninety seven percent (97%) confirmed that CSOs/NGOs healthcare facilities played a major role in health- care service delivery. 84% traveled long distances to access the healthcare services including child immunization services. Travelling long distances (>2 km) to access for health care services including immunization compared to short distance (<1 km) (OR = 0.4, P = 0.0001), possessing a food stores (enguli) compared to not having a food store (enguli) (OR = 2.3, P = 0.002), having separate animal houses compared to not having livestock houses (OR = 0.09, P = 0.0001), and owning a bicycle compared to not having a bicycle (OR = 2.2, P = 0.005) are important determinants for the number of clients at CSO health centers. Further, possessing and using a cellphone compared to no cellphone (OR = 3.7, P = 0.001), Possessing and watching a television compared to not having a television (OR = 2.4, P = 0.002), educated compared to not acquiring any formal education (OR = 0.084, P = 0.0001), and female compared to male respondent (OR = 0.49, P = 0.0045) are other most important factors likely to determine the numbers of clients at the CSO healthcare. Conclusion: Geographies of CSO and community socioeconomic strongly determine the operations and the roles played by the CSO healthcare services in Uganda. Further studies to assess the role of CSO health service providers in other healthcare services need to be done.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherHealthen_US
dc.subjectCivil Society Organization (CSO)en_US
dc.subjectHealthcareen_US
dc.subjectKabarole districten_US
dc.subjectUgandaen_US
dc.titleThe role of civil society organisations (CSOs) in healthcare delivery system: A case study of child immunization in Kabarole district, Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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