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dc.contributor.authorSingh, Kumud K.
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Michael D.
dc.contributor.authorChen, Jie
dc.contributor.authorPhiri, Kelesitse
dc.contributor.authorRousseau, Christine
dc.contributor.authorKuhn, Louise
dc.contributor.authorCoutsoudis, Anna
dc.contributor.authorJackson, J. Brooks
dc.contributor.authorGuay, Laura A.
dc.contributor.authorMusoke, Philippa
dc.contributor.authorMmiro, Francis
dc.contributor.authorSemba, Richard D.
dc.contributor.authorSpector, Stephen A.
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-31T12:29:40Z
dc.date.available2022-01-31T12:29:40Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationSingh, K. K., Hughes, M. D., Chen, J., Phiri, K., Rousseau, C., Kuhn, L., ... & Spector, S. A. (2008). Associations of che-mokine receptor polymorphisms With HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission in sub-Saharan Africa: possible modulation of genetic effects by antiretrovirals. Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999), 49(3), 259.doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e318186eaa4en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/1670
dc.description.abstractHIV-1 mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) remains an important route of infection in sub-Saharan Africa.Genetic variants in CCR5 promoter, CCR2, CX3CR1, and Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) genes were determined in 980 infants from sub-Saharan Africa using real-time polymerase chain reaction to determine association with MTCT.In antiretroviral-naive mother–infant pairs (n = 637), CCR5 promoter polymorphisms at positions 59029: A allele vs. G/G [odds ratio (OR): 1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04 to 2.48; P = 0.032] and 59356: T allele vs. C/C (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.41 to 0.96; P = 0.033) and CCR2-180: G allele vs. A/A (OR: 3.32, 95% CI: 1.13 to 9.73; P = 0.029) were associated with risk of MTCT. Treatment of HIV-1–infected mothers and infants with single-dose nevirapine or perinatal zidovudine altered but did not eliminate the association of genetic variants with MTCT.CCR5 promoter, CCR2, and CX3CR1 polymorphisms were associated with risk of MTCT likely through their role as an HIV-1 coreceptor or by modulating the early immune response. Host genetics may continue to alter MTCT when short-course interventions that only partially suppress virus are used. These findings will need to be confirmed in validation cohorts with a large number of infected infants.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJournal of acquired immune deficiency syndromesen_US
dc.subjectmother-to-child transmission, HIV-1, chemokine/chemokine receptor genotypes, antiretroviralsen_US
dc.titleAssociations of Chemokine Receptor Polymorphisms With HIV-1 Mother-to-Child Transmission in Sub-Saharan Africa: Possible Modulation of Genetic Effects by Antiretroviralsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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