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dc.contributor.authorPinto, Andrew D.
dc.contributor.authorOlupot, Peter Olupot
dc.contributor.authorNeufeld, Victor R.
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-26T21:12:35Z
dc.date.available2022-01-26T21:12:35Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationPinto, A. D., Olupot-Olupot, P., & Neufeld, V. R. (2006). Health implications of small arms and light weapons in eastern Uganda. Medicine, conflict and survival, 22(3), 207-219.https://doi.org/10.1080/13623690600772568en_US
dc.identifier.issn1362-3699
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/1574
dc.description.abstractInjuries due to small arms and light weapons (SALW) are common in developing countries with ongoing collective violence, or those that exist in a post-conflict state. Uganda has a long history of armed conflict, but little quantitative evidence is available about the extent of the problem of SALW. We performed a review of all injuries due to SALW at Mbale Regional Hospital in eastern Uganda for the six-year period 1998–2003. Using a standardised questionnaire, we recorded information from over 200 cases concerning the characteristics of the victim, the incident, the weapon used and the care received. The majority involved males and occurred in the context of conflict within tribal communities, or armed robberies throughout the region. Each injury is of significant cost to the healthcare system and to the victim. Prevention, through limiting the availability of the ‘vector’ of disease (SALW), is a key part of the solution to this problem.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMedicine, conflict and survivalen_US
dc.subjectHealth effects; Peace through health; Small arms and light weapons; Ugandaen_US
dc.titleHealth implications of small arms and light weapons in eastern Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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