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dc.contributor.authorMuhwezi, Wilson Winstons
dc.contributor.authorBanura, Cecily
dc.contributor.authorKampikaho Turiho, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorMirembe, Florence
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-21T21:37:13Z
dc.date.available2022-01-21T21:37:13Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationMuhwezi WW, Banura C, Turiho AK, Mirembe F (2014) Parents’ Knowledge, Risk Perception and Willingness to Allow Young Males to Receive Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines in Uganda. PLoS ONE 9(9): e106686. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0106686en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1371/journal.pone.0106686
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/1410
dc.description.abstractThe Ministry of Health in Uganda in collaboration with the Program for Appropriate Technology for Health (PATH) supported by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2008–2009 vaccinated approximately 10,000 girls with the bivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. We assessed parent’s knowledge, risk perception and willingness to allow son(s) to receive HPV vaccines in future through a cross-sectional survey of secondary school boys aged 10–23 years in 4 districts. 377 questionnaires were distributed per district and 870 were used in analysis. Parents that had ever heard about cervical cancer and HPV vaccines; those who would allow daughter(s) to be given the vaccine and those who thought that HPV infection was associated with genital warts were more willing to allow son(s) to receive the HPV vaccine. Unwilling parents considered HPV vaccination of boys unimportant (p = 0.003), believed that only females should receive the vaccine (p = 0.006), thought their son(s) couldn’t contract HPV (p = 0.010), didn’t know about HPV sexual transmissibility (p = 0.002), knew that males could not acquire HPV (p = 0.000) and never believed that the HPV vaccines could protect against HPV (p = 0.000). Acceptance of HPV vaccination of daughters and likelihood of recommending HPV vaccines to son(s) of friends and relatives predicted parental willingness to allow sons to receive HPV vaccines. Probable HPV vaccination of boys is a viable complement to that of girls. Successfulness of HPV vaccination relies on parental acceptability and sustained sensitization about usefulness of HPV vaccines even for boys is vital.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPLoS ONEen_US
dc.subjectParents’ Knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectRisk Perceptionen_US
dc.subjectYoung Malesen_US
dc.subjectHuman Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccinesen_US
dc.subjectUgandaen_US
dc.titleParents’ Knowledge, Risk Perception and Willingness to Allow Young Males to Receive Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines in Ugandaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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