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dc.contributor.authorOnonge, Sam
dc.contributor.authorSarikiaeli Okello, Elialilia
dc.contributor.authorMirembe, Florence
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-21T18:25:24Z
dc.date.available2022-01-21T18:25:24Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationOnonge, S., Okello, E. S., & Mirembe, F. (2016). Excessive bleeding is a normal cleansing process: a qualitative study of postpartum haemorrhage among rural Uganda women. BMC pregnancy and childbirth, 16(1), 1-11. DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1014-9en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1186/s12884-016-1014-9
dc.identifier.urihttps://nru.uncst.go.ug/xmlui/handle/123456789/1388
dc.description.abstractPostpartum haemorrhage (PPH) remains the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. The main strategy for preventing PPH is the use of uterotonic drugs given prophylactically by skilled health workers. However, in settings where many women still deliver at home without skilled attendants, uterotonics are often inaccessible. In such cases, women and their caregivers need to recognize PPH promptly so, as to seek expert care. For this reason, it is important to understand how women and their caregivers recognize PPH, as well as the actions they undertake to prevent and treat PPH in home births. Such knowledge can also inform programs aiming to make uterotonics accessible at the community level.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMC pregnancy and childbirthen_US
dc.subjectPostpartum haemorrhageen_US
dc.subjectHome birthsen_US
dc.subjectIntra-partum practicesen_US
dc.subjectDelay seeking careen_US
dc.titleExcessive bleeding is a normal cleansing process: a qualitative study of postpartum haemorrhage among rural Uganda womenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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